A Hard Pelmet that no longer fits the brief!

The Customer is Always Right!
Um, we’ve got a slight problem, I shouted down the corridor. “Oh dear, what’s that?” asked my client from downstairs? As she came into the room (her newly decorated twins’ bedroom) I explained the problem. “Well, I’m afraid you didn’t tell me you were installing a fitted wardrobe next to the window” I said!

The brief: with two new babies, keeping the light out was a priority, and so we opted for the combination of a dimout blind spanning both sash windows and curtains. The curtains were to hang on a track fixed to a pelmet board, with a hard (plywood stiffened) pelmet completing the look (and helping to keep light from washing into the room over the top of the curtains).

No room for the pelmet! But as you’ll see from the photo below, the newly installed wardrobe gave us a bit of a problem. It was sitting exactly where we intended to hang the pelmet, and with the curtains already made there was no way we could raise the track and pelmet board so that the pelmet could clear the wardrobe.

A cupboard has been fitted since we measured
A cupboard has been fitted since we measured for our client’s pelmeted curtains
The wardrobe architrave protrudes into the reveal preventing us hanging the pelmet in its intended position
The wardrobe architrave protrudes into the reveal preventing us from hanging the pelmet in its intended position

These situations, whilst challenging can also be pretty fun, because you sometimes have to be really creative to work a way around the problem. It suddenly occurred to me that if we raised the pelmet up the pelmet board so that the bottom of the pelmet sat just above the wardrobe door, we could resolve the problem. There were two problems with this idea though – we would need to take a piece out of the cupboard and the velcro strip that ran along the back of the pelmet along the top edge (which fixes the pelmet to the pelmet board) would have to be unpicked and moved further down the back of the pelmet.

So here’s how we did it:

Step 1 – Marking the piece to be removed from the wardrobe

A line is drawn to indicate the area that needs to be removed
A line is drawn to indicate the area that needs to be removed

Step 2Removing the wardrobe architraving

The architrave is carefully sawn through and removed
The architrave is carefully sawn through and removed

Step 3 – Repositioning the velcro: the velcro was carefully unpicked and repositioned parallel to the top of the pelmet, approximately a third of the way down the back of the pelmet.

Step 4 – A little trick with plastic: we covered the side returns of the pelmet board with plastic so that we could slide the pelmet into place without the opposing velcro strips on the pelmet and board catching each other, and when the pelmet board was in exactly the right position, we removed the plastic so that the velcro strips knitted together.

Cover the velcro with a plastic sheet to prevent the opposing trips of velcro catching as the pelmet is slid into place
Cover the velcro with a plastic sheet to prevent the opposing trips of velcro catching as the pelmet is slid into place

Step 5 – Sliding the pelmet into place: the pelmet is finally in place in its new, elevated position.

The Pelmet in its final position - fitting snugly just above the wardrobe door
The Pelmet in its final position – fitting snugly just above the wardrobe door